THE 10 BEST BOOKS I READ IN 2019

This was a bit of a lost year for this blog, since I took an unprecedented hiatus from March up until last week, and though that partly reflects the fact that I read fewer books than I normally do in a year, I still read a decent amount, and came across a good number of … Continue reading THE 10 BEST BOOKS I READ IN 2019

REVIEW: LABYRINTH, BY BURHAN SÖNMEZ, TR. ÜMIT HUSSEIN (2019)

CN: Book features a suicide attempt, head trauma, and some degree of existential dread. Burhan Sönmez’s Labyrinth tells the story of Boratin, a 28-year-old Turkish blues musician living in Istanbul who one day inexplicably decides to jump off the Bosphorus bridge. Somehow, he survives, but his memories have been either lost or scrambled. He can’t … Continue reading REVIEW: LABYRINTH, BY BURHAN SÖNMEZ, TR. ÜMIT HUSSEIN (2019)

REVIEW: THE CITY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, BY CHARLIE JANE ANDERS (2019)

The City in the Middle of the Night is a novel rich in twists and turns, which makes it tricky to write a spoiler-free summary, so I'll just say this: it's set in a far future where what little is left of humanity has been forced to settle on a near-uninhabitable planet named January, and it largely follows the adventures of Sophie, … Continue reading REVIEW: THE CITY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, BY CHARLIE JANE ANDERS (2019)

REVIEW: THE BAREFOOT WOMAN, BY SCHOLASTIQUE MUKASONGA, TR. JORDAN STUMP (2018)

The Barefoot Woman is a strange, deceptively subversive book. The title, the prologue, the first two or three chapters—at first, all these things led me to believe that the book would mostly be a tribute to Mukasonga's mother, a portrait in words, an expression of grief and remembrance dedicated to a woman with an extraordinary … Continue reading REVIEW: THE BAREFOOT WOMAN, BY SCHOLASTIQUE MUKASONGA, TR. JORDAN STUMP (2018)

REVIEW: SABRINA, BY NICK DRNASO (2018)

There's something unsettling about those illustrated instruction cards airlines give you to prepare you in case of emergency. Obviously that's partly because they raise the spectre of one of all-time most terrifying nightmare scenarios, dying in a plane crash. But, also, I think some of their creepy vibes stem from the stylised people that populate … Continue reading REVIEW: SABRINA, BY NICK DRNASO (2018)