REVIEW: FLIGHTS, BY OLGA TOKARCZUK, TRANSLATED BY JENNIFER CROFT (2017)

When I finished reading Olga Tokarczuk's Flights, I immediately found a spot for it on my shelves, between Season of Migration to the North and Naondel. And suddenly I was truck by how small an object it is. It spans so many topics and countries and centuries that it should be Atlas-sized, or several volumes … Continue reading REVIEW: FLIGHTS, BY OLGA TOKARCZUK, TRANSLATED BY JENNIFER CROFT (2017)

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KESHIKI: A GUIDE TO STRANGERS PRESS’S SERIES OF CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE WRITING

Some books are like puzzles. And it's hard for me to resist thinking about Strangers Press's Keshiki series of contemporary Japanese writing as, specifically, a jigsaw puzzle. Most publishers would probably have gathered these stories in a single anthology, but Strangers decided to split them up into eight chapbooks, each between just over 30 and … Continue reading KESHIKI: A GUIDE TO STRANGERS PRESS’S SERIES OF CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE WRITING

REVIEW: BANTHOLOGY: STORIES FROM UNWANTED NATIONS (2018)

Almost exactly a year ago, on January 27th, 2017, Donald Trump signed an Executive Order banning people from seven Muslim-majority countries (Lybia, Sudan, Somalia, Yemen, Syria, Iraq, and Iran) from entering the United States for 90 days, halting refugee resettlement for 120 days, and banning Syrian refugees indefinitely. In response to this, independent British publisher … Continue reading REVIEW: BANTHOLOGY: STORIES FROM UNWANTED NATIONS (2018)

DOUBLE REVIEW: Sarah Hall’s MADAME ZERO and Patty Yumi Cottrell’s SORRY TO DISRUPT THE PEACE

CN: suicide. It happened once before and it's happened again: I read two books in quick succession and I'm finding it hard not to think of them in relation to each other. They are, in many ways, very different: Sarah Hall's Madame Zero is a short story collection, Patty Yumi Cottrell's Sorry to Disrupt the … Continue reading DOUBLE REVIEW: Sarah Hall’s MADAME ZERO and Patty Yumi Cottrell’s SORRY TO DISRUPT THE PEACE

#WITMONTH REVIEW: JAGANNATH, BY KARIN TIDBECK, TRANSLATED BY KARIN TIDBECK (2012)

August is Women in Translation Month (#WITMonth), so I'm only reviewing books by women in translation. In Jagannath's title story, Karin Tidbeck imagines a postapocalyptic future where humans have forged a symbiotic alliance with gigantic caterpillars. The caterpillars constantly roam the earth in search of sustenance, and the humans live inside them: men--who have become … Continue reading #WITMONTH REVIEW: JAGANNATH, BY KARIN TIDBECK, TRANSLATED BY KARIN TIDBECK (2012)